American hedonism closes its eyes to death, and has been
incapable of exorcising the destructive power of the moment
with a wisdom like that of the Epicureans of antiquity.

- Octavio Paz
Death is un-American, and an affront to every citizen's inalienable
right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

- Arnold Toynbee
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"As long as such self-serving hypocrisy
motivates America's response, Ukraine will
only sink further into needless bloodshed,
and that blood will be on America's head."
JOIN THE DISCUSSION
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In America everybody is of the opinion that he has no social superiors,
since all men are equal, but he does not admit that he has no social inferiors,
for, from the time of Jefferson onward, the doctrine that all men are equal
applies only upwards, not downwards.

― Bertrand Russell
Global Coke
Global Coke
"What those 'racists' are reflexively and rightly reacting
to is the soulless chill as the fire goes out beneath the
melting pot. Those who think America can thrive as a
'cultural mosaic' are worse than fools; they're Canadians."

JOIN THE DISCUSSION
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Kim Jong-un and Dennis Rodman
Kim Jong-un and Dennis Rodman
"[Dennis Rodman's trip to North Korea] struck
me as uncannily symbolic of, if I may speak
broadly and loosely, the best and worst
of the 'American character abroad.'"

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"But where, I wonder, is Obama's hard choice, in this his
now sixth year of leadership? Where is his defining decision,
against the grain, made solely because it seemed right?
Drone strikes in Yemen?"

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Two centuries ago, a former European colony decided to catch up with Europe.
It succeeded so well that the United States of America became a monster,
in which the taints, the sickness and the inhumanity of Europe
have grown to appalling dimensions.

― Frantz Fanon
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"We feel better living in a world with privacy, with intimate, unmonitored communication when desired. Those values mean something to us, and give our lives dignity and humanity."
JOIN THE DISCUSSION
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What the United States does best is understand itself.
What it does worst is understand others.

- Carlos Fuentes
Poor Mexico, so far from God
and so close to the United States.

- Porfirio Diaz
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"Indeed, everything about the American southland was magical
and exotic to the young Canadian musicians, from the sights
and smells to the drawling manner of speech to, especially, the
central role that music played in people’s everyday lives."

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America is a mistake, a giant mistake.
- Sigmund Freud
America is an adorable woman chewing tobacco.
- Auguste Bartholdi
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"This is the tone of the China Century, a subtle
mix of Nazi/Soviet bravado and 'oriental'
cunning -- easily misunderstood, and
never
heard before, in a real enemy, by the West."

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Coke and 'America the Beautiful'
Coke and 'America the Beautiful'
"And for the others who argued for English-only
patriotism, I note that there are more than
57 million Americans (about 20% of the nation)
whose first-language is not English...."

JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Coke and 'America the Beautiful'
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"This is the behavior, and the fate, of paranoid
old-world tyrants like Hitler or Saddam, not liberal new-world democracies like America pretends to be."

JOIN THE DISCUSSION
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America is the only nation in history which
miraculously has gone directly from barbarism to
degeneration without the usual interval of civilization.

- Georges Clemenceau
I found there a country with thirty-two religions and only one sauce.
- Charles–Maurice Talleyrand
A people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle,
and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.

- Edmund Burke
America is the only country ever founded on the printed word.
- Marshall McLuhan
"The removal of racist sports nicknames (and mascots) seems outrageously belated
-- why, exactly, has this civil rights cause
taken so long to gain momentum?"

JOIN THE DISCUSSION
The atom bomb is a paper tiger which the
United States reactionaries use to scare people.
It looks terrible, but in fact it isn't.

- Mao Tse-tung
They made us many promises, more than I can remember, but
they kept only one; they promised to take our land, and they did.

- Red Cloud
In America sex is an obsession,
in other parts of the world it is a fact.

- Marlene Dietrich
I would rather have a nod from an American,
than a snuff-box from an emperor.

- Lord Byron
One day the United States discovered it was an empire.
But it didn’t know what an empire was.
It thought that an empire was merely the biggest of all corporations.

- Roberto Calasso
"For all the good things he did and tried to do, in a way, for me, Mandela's greatness lay more in what he did not do. And this, I think, is his greatest lesson for America."
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Americans are so enamored of equality, they would rather
be equal in slavery than unequal in freedom.

- Alexis de Tocqueville
newtown
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"No one, I thought, could watch those scenes, of young children slaughtered en masse, and so many parents grieving, without thinking that this, finally, would tip some kind of balance in the country."
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If you are prepared to accept the consequences of your dreams
then you must still regard America today with the same naive
enthusiasm as the generations that discovered the New World.

- Jean Baudrillard
I am willing to love all mankind, except an American.
- Samuel Johnson
America, thou half brother of the world;
With something good and bad of every land.

- Philip Bailey
"What can be more powerful than disinformation in the Information Age?"
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England and America are two countries separated by the same language.
- Sir Walter Besant
Christopher Columbus, as everyone knows, is honored by
posterity because he was the last to discover America.

- James Joyce
Now, from America, empty indifferent things
are pouring across, sham things, dummy life.

- Rainer Maria Rilke
If the United States is to recover fortitude and lucidity,
it must recover itself, and to recover itself it must
recover the "others"- the outcasts of the Western world.
- Octavio Paz
The youth of America is their oldest tradition.
It has been going on now for three hundred years.

- Oscar Wilde
"America really is, for most Americans, all things considered, a good place to be, and all they really want is for everyone to enjoy the same privilege and pleasure."
JOIN THE DISCUSSION
When good Americans die they go to Paris;
when bad Americans die they go to America.

- Oscar Wilde
jobs drug dealer
jobs drug dealer
They're nothing more than traffickers; and as the smart traffickers'll tell you, you don't use the merchandise. They are just inoculating their kids with a tech-drug serum, to immunize them against the very merchandise that put the **** bowling alley in their basement.
jobs drug dealer
America is therefore the land of the future, where, in the ages that
lie before us, the burden of the World's History shall reveal itself.

- Georg Friedrich Hegel
America is a large, friendly dog in a very small room.
Every time it wags its tail, it knocks over a chair.

- Arnold Toynbee
Americans always try to do the right thing after they've tried everything else.
- Winston Churchill
The thing that impresses me most about Americans
is the way parents obey their children.

- Edward, Duke of Windsor
Americans are apt to be unduly interested in discovering
what average opinion believes average opinion to be.

- John Maynard Keynes
Europe was created by history.
America was created by philosophy.

- Margaret Thatcher
America is God's crucible, the great Melting-Pot where all the races of
Europe are melting and reforming!... The real American has not yet arrived.
He is only in the crucible, I tell you - he will be the fusion of all races.

- Israel Zangwill
American dreams are strongest in the hearts of those
who have seen America only in their dreams.

- Pico Iyer
America: It's like Britain, only with buttons.
- Ringo Starr
The essential American soul is hard, isolate, stoic, and a killer.
It has never yet melted.

― D.H. Lawrence
I have two conflicting visions of America.
One is a kind of dream landscape and the other is a kind of black comedy.

― Bono
The American mirror, said the voice, the sad American mirror
of wealth and poverty and constant useless metamorphosis,
the mirror that sails and whose sails are pain.

― Roberto Bolaño

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Author Topic: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...


M Wendt
New Member
Posts: 3
M Wendt
Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: September 22, 2014, 15:56

First rule of every good drug pusher: don't be a victim of your own merchandise.

First rule of every good schoolyard pusher: get 'em while they're young.

First rule of every good schoolyard pusher with kids of his own: don't let your kid be victimized by the drug you're pushing on their schoolmates.

The first rule is just good business; the second is genius, since, if successfully followed, while you're profiting hugely from crippling the other kids, your kid becomes even stronger in comparison; especially if the particular drug you're 'marketing' is in fact immensely powerful when properly used, both by your kid, and against the others, as they all grow up.

But how? How to achieve this ideal of every schoolyard pusher with kids, given that your kid too will inevitably be exposed at some point to the same drug that's crippling all your victims at great profit to you (and your kid)?

Inoculation. Knowing the drug inside and out as you do, because in fact you have invented it; and even more importantly, knowing the subtle but highly effective strategies and tactics you yourself employ in 'marketing' it, making junkies of the children and willing procurators of their own parents; you expose your own children, when young, to just enough of the drug, in just the right way, to render them and them alone, effectively immune to the drug's crippling effects, when they are later fully exposed to, and indeed, successfully using it, as above.

I trust that the penalty for this behavior, for a career of this behavior--making immense profits by encouraging the disablement of other peoples' children in their most vulnerable and formative years, while consciously and assiduously protecting your own from the same fate--would be severe; morally of course, but also legally, as parasites and criminals of the most disgusting sort.

I trust also that that penalty would be magnified if one's victims numbered in the thousands and millions; as in the case of the kingpins of drug cartels, for example.

I'd be interested and grateful to understand how Steve Jobs and his legion of emulators are not precisely of this sort.

And if they are even slightly of this sort, given the severity and magnitude of the damage being done (in the candid opinion of Steve Jobs and his legion of emulators), to understand how they are allowed to walk the same streets as my child.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/11/fashion/steve-jobs-apple-was-a-low-tech-parent.html?_r=0

“When Steve Jobs was running Apple, he was known to call journalists to either pat them on the back for a recent article or, more often than not, explain how they got it wrong,” Nick Bilton reports for The New York Times. “I was on the receiving end of a few of those calls. But nothing shocked me more than something Mr. Jobs said to me in late 2010 after he had finished chewing me out for something I had written about an iPad shortcoming.”

“‘So, your kids must love the iPad?’ I asked Mr. Jobs, trying to change the subject. The company’s first tablet was just hitting the shelves,” Bilton reports. “‘They haven’t used it,’ he told me. ‘We limit how much technology our kids use at home.'”

“I’m sure I responded with a gasp and dumbfounded silence. I had imagined the Jobs’s household was like a nerd’s paradise: that the walls were giant touch screens, the dining table was made from tiles of iPads and that iPods were handed out to guests like chocolates on a pillow,” Bilton reports. “Nope, Mr. Jobs told me, not even close. Since then, I’ve met a number of technology chief executives and venture capitalists who say similar things: they strictly limit their children’s screen time, often banning all gadgets on school nights, and allocating ascetic time limits on weekends.”

(Bold mine)

It's the gasp and dumbfounded silence, I like.

They're nothing more than traffickers; and as the smart traffickers'll tell you, you don't use the merchandise. They are just inoculating their kids with a tech-drug serum, to immunize them against the very merchandise that put the fucking bowling alley in their basement.

And where is the law here?

Here's a fair law: American children spend an average--an average--of 7 1/2 hours on these criminals' smartphones and other electronic screens, and governments, persuaded by the Great Con, are building them into the very foundation of 21st-century education of children (I'm the editor for the biggest distributor of these devices in Japan, who's working real close with the traffickers to make them ubiquitous, addictive and indispensable--paedagogically and morally indispensable to children, school employees and parents); I say the traffickers must expose their children to at least half that--let's be kind, say 3 hours per day--or have their license to traffic revoked.

What do you think?

Not our fault if they want to flood the classrooms with them (on our advice), surround their children with them (with our blessing and persuasion), and above all, abandon their children to them (Marvelling shoulder shrug).

I mean, really. Does no one else think there's something seriously and obviously wrong here? (Which should be pretty easy to correct.)

Where is the outrage? And where is the covenant to resist it? What a world.



Charles F
New Member
Posts: 1
Charles F
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: September 26, 2014, 14:57

Amen, brother. I share your outrage.
But then again... what could we possibly expect to happen here?
Of course no one is going to pass a law against this stuff. It's too (economically) important. It's too (psychologically) ingrained now. It's a done deal, brother.
I keep the hard stuff (most of it) away from my kids, but I'm not holding my breath for any policemen to start arresting the 'dealers.' (Maybe a totalitarian state could do it -- but even China can't keep the Internet out...)



M Wendt
New Member
Posts: 3
M Wendt
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: September 28, 2014, 23:05

Quote from Charles F on September 26, 2014, 14:57
Amen, brother. I share your outrage.
But then again... what could we possibly expect to happen here?
Of course no one is going to pass a law against this stuff. It's too (economically) important. It's too (psychologically) ingrained now. It's a done deal, brother.

So said the bigots before Martin Luther King, brother.

I keep the hard stuff (most of it) away from my kids, but I'm not holding my breath for any policemen to start arresting the 'dealers.' (Maybe a totalitarian state could do it -- but even China can't keep the Internet out...)

No holding the breath here, of course, but no shrugging of the shoulders either.
While nothing's to be expected but the worst, what we could possibly do here is speak out, rub our heads with balloons a little, build up a little static electricity, on the chance (it's happened before, but all we know is that it can't if we don't) that some lightning rod will appear to focus that charge, as King did, and Gandhi before him. The religion that supported King being largely defunct in (non-kooky) America, I imagine such a figure emerging from the tech world itself (like Musk, but with more vulnerability to wisdom--then again, he's still young to be wise)--one of the Jobsians with a sick conscience, maybe, to just stand up, admit it, apologize, and try to make amends.
That too has happened before.
Think how close they are, in fact: all one of them needs to do is break ranks, recommend that other careful parents should probably consider doing the same--what will the others do, contradict him, when they're obviously doing the same?--and then the ball is officially rolling, sticky with his/her authority.
Now parents and educators have a lever; and those, as we know, can move worlds.



Geoff-
Hamilton
Administrator
Posts: 170
Geoff Hamilton
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: September 29, 2014, 21:51

Think how close they are, in fact: all one of them needs to do is break ranks, recommend that other careful parents should probably consider doing the same--what will the others do, contradict him, when they're obviously doing the same?--and then the ball is officially rolling, sticky with his/her authority.

Progress here (lessening the toxic dependence on tech) would certainly be galvanized by a major figure 'breaking ranks,' though there's something about those folk (as far as I know their general sensibility) that makes me feel pessimistic about the kind of break they'd make. That is, what could we expect they'd be breaking toward, given their lifelong immersion in and dedication to tech-saturated life? My own (wistful) hope for my (not yet born) kids is that I'll find a community of other parents willing to de-network, de-virtualize their children (with brief periods of moderated connectivity, of course -- say, for example, an hour on Their America twice a week, just to let them know what they're [not] missing).



Geoff-
Hamilton
Administrator
Posts: 170
Geoff Hamilton
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: October 1, 2014, 14:00

More evidence of tech toxicity...

By: Deborah Netburn Los Angeles Times, Published on Mon Sep 15 2014
What happens when you take about 50 sixth-graders and send them to a nature camp with no access to computers, tablets and mobile phones?
A new study suggests that after just five days their ability to understand non-verbal social cues improves.
Non-verbal social cues are the emotional information we pick up from people around us that is not communicated through words. It includes facial expressions, eye contact, tone of voice and body posture.
As children spend more time corresponding with their friends via text rather than talking to them face to face, the researchers wondered whether they were losing the ability to read these important cues.
“The idea for this study came from looking at the way my older child and her friends’ older siblings were communicating,” said Yalda Uhls, who runs the Los Angeles office of the non-profit Common Sense Media. “I’ve been at parties where the kids are all hanging out, but instead of looking at each other, they are staring at their phones.”

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2014/09/15/the_power_of_unplugging_your_children.html



Geoff-
Hamilton
Administrator
Posts: 170
Geoff Hamilton
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: October 5, 2014, 09:37

Here's another article elaborating on the technocrats' withholding 'tech heroin' from their kids. A striking weirdness in the author's commentary (I assume M Wendt would agree) is the absence of any moral condemnation of this decision to save one's own while sacrificing the rest of the world's children.

Why Steve Jobs Didn’t Let His Kids Use iPads (And Why You Shouldn’t Either)
Sarah Lesnar

If you fall within the Gen-Y era like us, chances are you’ve given a bunch of thought as to how you would raise your own children in this day and age (assuming you don’t have children already). Especially with technology, so much has changed since our childhoods in the 90s. Here’s one question: Would you introduce the technological wonder/heroin that is the iPod and iPad to your kids?

Steve Jobs wouldn’t, and for good reason too.

In a Sunday article, New York Times reporter Nick Bilton said he once assumingly asked Jobs, “So your kids must love the iPad?”

Jobs responded:

“They haven’t used it. We limit how much technology our kids use at home.”
Especially in Silicon Valley, there is actually a trend of tech execs and engineers who shield their kids from technology. They even send their kids to non-tech schools like the Waldorf School in Los Altos, where computers aren’t found anywhere because they only focus on hands-on learning.

There is a quote that was highlighted in The Times by Chris Anderson, CEO of 3D Robotics and a father of five. He explains what drives those who work in tech to keep it from their kids.

“My kids accuse me and my wife of being fascists and overly concerned about tech, and they say that none of their friends have the same rules… That’s because we have seen the dangers of technology firsthand. I’ve seen it in myself, I don’t want to see that happen to my kids.”
If our current addictions to our iPhones and other tech is any indication, we may be setting up our children for incomplete, handicapped lives devoid of imagination, creativity and wonder when we hook them onto technology at an early age. We were the last generation to play outside precisely because we didn’t have smartphones and laptops. We learned from movement, hands-on interaction, and we absorbed information through books and socialization with other humans as opposed to a Google search.

Learning in different ways has helped us become more well-rounded individuals — so, should we be more worried that we are robbing our children of the ability to Snapchat and play “Candy Crush” all day if we don’t hand them a smartphone, or should we more worried that we would be robbing them of a healthier, less dependent development if we do hand them a smartphone? I think Steve Jobs had it right in regard to his kids.

So the next time you think about how you will raise your kids, you may want to (highly) consider not giving them whatever fancy tech we’ll have while they are growing up. Play outside with them and surround them with nature; they might hate you, but they will absolutely thank you for it later, because I’m willing to bet that’s exactly how many of us feel about it now that we are older.

http://nextshark.com/why-steve-jobs-didnt-let-his-kids-use-ipads-and-why-you-shouldnt-either/



M Wendt
New Member
Posts: 3
M Wendt
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: October 5, 2014, 13:57

"A striking weirdness in the author's commentary is the absence of any moral condemnation of this decision to save one's own while sacrificing the rest of the world's children."

Two related reasons, typically combined (as in this article) in the case of the tech pushers:
1) they're not really men, but gods among men (cf. the apotheosization of St Steven);
2) America's America-sized blind spot to social responsibility (here = 'Hey, I just market it; it's your choice!');
both of them rooted in and nourished by the absurd vanity of the American secular materialist digit.



Alex Wang
Experienced Their American
Posts: 14
Alex Wang
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: October 10, 2014, 21:02

How about charging the inventor of the television with child abuse? Or maybe we should put down the RCA Victor dog as a bad example?
Come on, M Wendt, it's democracy; and democracy, though rarely pretty, is still the most necessary of the necessary evils (politically systems), and has repeatedly proven to be by far the best at self-healing. Any wounds here will be healed; and if not, just come with the territory.
Whereas the sort of other-worldly idealism that's showing through your post has done incalculable and sometimes irreparable harm.
You don't want your kids 'using', don't let them use--so much the better for them (relative to the 'victims').



MitchellGu-
nn
Novice Their American
Posts: 5
MitchellGunn
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: October 14, 2014, 11:35

I think there's certainly an interesting discussion to be had here - as evidenced by the posts above - but I personally don't see as much of a moral or ethical dilemma, and I (perhaps surprisingly) don't even see Jobs as being a hypocrite.
In a certain way, one almost has to separate the "Steve Jobs business" aspect from the "Steve Jobs parent" aspect. In terms of business, yes, he helped create, market, and promote these devices, because that's his job (no pun intended). As a parent, though, he personally does not feel that he wishes to provide these devices to his children.
It may just be a failure of memory, but I don't recall any iPad or iPhone ads being directly marketed at children, much less promoting giving kids unrestricted access to technology. There are certainly campaigns that highlight some of the educational uses of such technology, but almost all of these focus on controlled, in-classroom use. I certainly don't see the "pusher" aspect being described above.
If Jobs had made a point of not using iPads or iPhones himself, believing the technology to be disruptive or harmful, I would obviously see that as a point of concerning hypocrisy. But as it is, I just see it as him making a choice about how to raise his children, and other parents are free to make their own choices. It's like Alex Wang says above - if you don't want your kids exposed to this technology, don't give it to them. But you can't blame the company that's making this technology available, not when they aren't even "pushing" it to children.



DJ
New Member
Posts: 1
DJ
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: October 21, 2014, 12:56

Technology is only harmful whenever there is abuse carried out by the person utilizing it, that's already been established and made clear. Hence, I think calling Steve Jobs a trafficker is far from the case, seeing as he is just like a young individual who just graduated with a Degree in Nursing or someone who's working as a sales clerk at a department store --- it's just an occupation of providing products and services undertaken with the purpose of achieving financial security (regardless of magnitude).

The target market for iPads and iPhones aren't even children, like the previous commenter mentioned, it's just that parents with loads of money to spare spoil their kids with all the most luxurious and most unnecessary stuff. These are simply being used as tools for whatever kinds of immoral or unethical use influenced by media and pop culture, such as leaked Snapchat and iCloud photos/scandals, but by themselves, they are completely harmless.

The main issue here, in my opinion, is not about Steve Jobs being a "pusher" of any sort, but more on the morality of the common folk and how they intend to use all this advanced and modern technology in their daily lives, regardless of what the original poster aimed to point out. What he provides are products, it's all up to the person purchasing those products on how they intend to use it. Would you call a hairbrush or hair spray manufacturer a 'sex trafficker" if some female decided to use their products for self pleasure, or a even a video game company a "pusher" for creating a first person shooter that pays close attention to detail in the visuals and environmental effects just because some people were negligent in ensuring their kids weren't exposed to violence during their young and developmental years, thus leading to their rather erratic and violent behavior due to addiction to gaming? I certainly wouldn't.

Just my two cents, though. Great conversation you guys got going on here, regards all the way from the Philippines. 🙂



tylerestua-
rt
Novice Their American
Posts: 5
Tyler Eliot Stuart
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: November 9, 2014, 21:40

I find the facility with which Mitchell distinguished the "business Steve Jobs" from the "family Steve Jobs" disconcerting. For the most part, I agree that while there is a hypocrisy in his actions, he should not be condemned as a drug pusher. I do not, however, think we should in our capitalist society separate business from "family." By family, I mean ethics. I would argue –– in the most simple of terms –– that much of the financial collapse of 2008 occurred because people were selling things they wouldn't buy. No, the separation of business and ethics is extremely dangerous. In the case of Steve Jobs, we don't know what the effects of the iPad are on children. But we do know that 1) children are using them, regardless of how they are advertized and 2) Steve Jobs wouldn't let his kids touch them. That is frightening. While I think there are more alarming examples of this dichotomy, I think we should be wary of it in all forms –– even in an iPad.



simpson
Novice Their American
Posts: 8
simpson
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: November 14, 2014, 09:26

iPads are not drugs and Apple does not force or encourage parents to purchase these products for their children. Additionally, Jobs doesn't limit his restrictions to iPads — he kept his kids away from all technology, so we can conservatively presume that to include cell phones, television, video games and computers too. To compare the sale of these products to the sale of illegal drugs like heroin and cocaine is so beyond sensational.

The same debate played out during the 1980s and 1990s over television and video games, too. Ronald Reagan — not my favorite dude in the world — vetoed legislation that would have regulated children's programming because, he said at the time, "This bill simply cannot be reconciled with the freedom of expression secured by our Constitution." Now, buying an iPad or computer does not fall under freedom of expression, but without any proven dangers to children, to argue the iPad is somehow dangerous is to jump to an unproven conclusion. Restricting sales infringes even more on personal and professional freedoms than selling them in the first place. As for the paranoid logic of Silicon Valley executives who don't let their kids near technology, these people should not be taken as paragons of virtue or wisdom. They're often batshit insane.

The only thing one can reasonably take away from Steve Jobs' decision to restrict his kids' access to technogology is that he made a choice as a parent to do so. The same way every parent makes a million choices every day about what things their children will be exposed to. There are many different ways to raise children!

Taking the original poster's logic to an extreme, one can argue that producers of processed foods, candy, and certain cereals are guilty of similar criminals. No one here seems to be taking Kellogs to task for making Frosted Flakes, are they?

What makes this discussion even sillier is the proven educated benefits iPads have had in the class room. Multiple studies have found iPads improved students abilities to learn. Here are two separate studies, one reported here in Wired (done with the participation with Apple) and one reported here by National Geographic carried out by the founding member of the Science Education Department at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Massachusetts, just to serve as quick examples. More exist if you perform a quick Google search.

Anyway, I agreed with this post more than anything else by a country mile:

In a certain way, one almost has to separate the "Steve Jobs business" aspect from the "Steve Jobs parent" aspect. In terms of business, yes, he helped create, market, and promote these devices, because that's his job (no pun intended). As a parent, though, he personally does not feel that he wishes to provide these devices to his children.
It may just be a failure of memory, but I don't recall any iPad or iPhone ads being directly marketed at children, much less promoting giving kids unrestricted access to technology. There are certainly campaigns that highlight some of the educational uses of such technology, but almost all of these focus on controlled, in-classroom use. I certainly don't see the "pusher" aspect being described above.



Mike-
Langston
Veteran Their American
Posts: 40
Mike Langston
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: November 16, 2014, 21:54

Of course this stuff is marketed at children -- the ads (in my city) are everywhere in public, on huge glittering billboards. The whole culture is immersed in this stuff.
As for whether or not it's a drug and its users addicts, here's the big test: what happens to people when you take it away from them? Well, we all know what the withdrawal is like...



MitchellGu-
nn
Novice Their American
Posts: 5
MitchellGunn
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: November 24, 2014, 16:18

I should clarify what I meant by "marketed at children." Of course many children, particularly those in urban centres or with regular media exposure, will be exposed to Apple's advertisements. They will also be exposed to a myriad of other ads for products and services. The differentiating factor is that some of these ads will be designed for (or targeted at) children, meaning that they are specifically created with the intention of making children desire that particular product or service. Personally, I have seen no such child-targeted advertisements from Apple. The whole "pusher" analogy sort of falls apart if there's no actual "pushing."

Perhaps an admittedly crass but demonstrative example could help. Maybe due to the awkwardness of the ensuing conversation, I very poignantly remember seeing an ad for Cialis while watching television with my parents when I was about 10 years old. The ad itself was subtle enough - all I gleaned was that it was promoting some sort of medication, though I promptly asked my parents what the medication was for. Clearly, even though I saw the advertisement, it was not targeted at me or designed to capture my attention and interest. By my definition, no matter how many children saw this advertisement, Cialis was certainly not being marketed at children.

Similarly, though Apple's advertisements may be seen by children, unless they are specifically designing the ads to entice children into buying their products (or getting their parents to buy them), Apple is not "pushing" their products on children.



connorwhea-
ton
New Member
Posts: 3
miniwheats666
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: November 27, 2014, 11:09

I don't believe that Steve Jobs not subjecting his children to Apple products is such a problem. We live in a relatively free country, people are allowed to do as they please and rear their children how they want (unless they abuse or neglect them, but that's another issue) working up a fuss over someone not using their own product is counter-productive especially now that the man is dead. In line with the drug dealer analogy, I would like to quote a famous rapper "I don't smoke crack mother F****r, I sell it." In a country consumed by capitalism, where the dollar is all powerful, who would blame someone for supplying a product that A. makes a ton of money and B. meets the demand of the populace? If focusing on what Steve Jobs did in his home life is your concern, then perhaps America has more problems than the rest of the world thought.



Rozu
New Member
Posts: 4
Rozu
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: November 24, 2015, 19:52

I agree with @Connerwheaton. I believe that Steve Jobs' innovation of Apple is one that is necessary for our advancing technological world. If not for these high quality products like an iPad or MacBook, the world would be lagging behind. We should be thanking Steve Jobs for his creation rather than being upset for children being glued to the products, which I would blame the parenting style than the technology for that. iPads are made to be used as a portable computer by adults and only making daily activities easier for us. Good parents should have proper control over their child's usage of technology and like Steve Job who actually cares enough to appropriately allot time to certain things that his child requires based on his/her age. As a parent Steve Jobs feels that his children not age appropriate to use the iPad but that does not mean that his children will not use it when they grow older nor does it devalue his contribution to technology. He just has good family values put into place and it is something that society can take note on.



JeanGiroux
Novice Their American
Posts: 8
JeanGiroux
Re: Steve Jobs, Drug Trafficker...
on: November 29, 2015, 21:21

I think, like all things in life, moderation is key. From personal experience, I can attest to the addictive properties of technology. Although it is not my intention to make this discussion overly scientific, it is commonly held that children undergo vast mental and emotional development during this phase. Thus, it would seem logical to me that overexposing children to iPad and iPhone screens would severely hamper their human ability to connect and communicate with others, especially during this early critical period when a child's brain is exceedingly malleable and subject to developing lifelong habits. As mentioned above, I do not think Jobs is being hypocritical, rather, I believe he is exercising responsible parenting. I, like others have mentioned on this post, have yet to see Apple marketing directed at children. Hence, the responsibility for acquainting our children with this potentially addictive and largely unnecessary "substance" falls squarely onto the parents.

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