American hedonism closes its eyes to death, and has been
incapable of exorcising the destructive power of the moment
with a wisdom like that of the Epicureans of antiquity.

- Octavio Paz
Death is un-American, and an affront to every citizen's inalienable
right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

- Arnold Toynbee
the_band_huge
the_band_huge
"As long as such self-serving hypocrisy
motivates America's response, Ukraine will
only sink further into needless bloodshed,
and that blood will be on America's head."
JOIN THE DISCUSSION
the_band_huge
In America everybody is of the opinion that he has no social superiors,
since all men are equal, but he does not admit that he has no social inferiors,
for, from the time of Jefferson onward, the doctrine that all men are equal
applies only upwards, not downwards.

― Bertrand Russell
Global Coke
Global Coke
"What those 'racists' are reflexively and rightly reacting
to is the soulless chill as the fire goes out beneath the
melting pot. Those who think America can thrive as a
'cultural mosaic' are worse than fools; they're Canadians."

JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Global Coke
Two centuries ago, a former European colony decided to catch up with Europe.
It succeeded so well that the United States of America became a monster,
in which the taints, the sickness and the inhumanity of Europe
have grown to appalling dimensions.

― Frantz Fanon
What the United States does best is understand itself.
What it does worst is understand others.

- Carlos Fuentes
Poor Mexico, so far from God
and so close to the United States.

- Porfirio Diaz
the_band_huge
the_band_huge
"Indeed, everything about the American southland was magical
and exotic to the young Canadian musicians, from the sights
and smells to the drawling manner of speech to, especially, the
central role that music played in people’s everyday lives."

JOIN THE DISCUSSION
the_band_huge
America is a mistake, a giant mistake.
- Sigmund Freud
America is an adorable woman chewing tobacco.
- Auguste Bartholdi
chimerica
chimerica
"This is the tone of the China Century, a subtle
mix of Nazi/Soviet bravado and 'oriental'
cunning -- easily misunderstood, and
never
heard before, in a real enemy, by the West."

JOIN THE DISCUSSION
chimerica
Coke and 'America the Beautiful'
Coke and 'America the Beautiful'
"And for the others who argued for English-only
patriotism, I note that there are more than
57 million Americans (about 20% of the nation)
whose first-language is not English...."

JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Coke and 'America the Beautiful'
predator-firing-missile4
predator-firing-missile4
"This is the behavior, and the fate, of paranoid
old-world tyrants like Hitler or Saddam, not liberal new-world democracies like America pretends to be."

JOIN THE DISCUSSION
predator-firing-missile4
America is the only nation in history which
miraculously has gone directly from barbarism to
degeneration without the usual interval of civilization.

- Georges Clemenceau
I found there a country with thirty-two religions and only one sauce.
- Charles–Maurice Talleyrand
A people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle,
and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.

- Edmund Burke
America is the only country ever founded on the printed word.
- Marshall McLuhan
"The removal of racist sports nicknames (and mascots) seems outrageously belated
-- why, exactly, has this civil rights cause
taken so long to gain momentum?"

JOIN THE DISCUSSION
The atom bomb is a paper tiger which the
United States reactionaries use to scare people.
It looks terrible, but in fact it isn't.

- Mao Tse-tung
They made us many promises, more than I can remember, but
they kept only one; they promised to take our land, and they did.

- Red Cloud
In America sex is an obsession,
in other parts of the world it is a fact.

- Marlene Dietrich
I would rather have a nod from an American,
than a snuff-box from an emperor.

- Lord Byron
One day the United States discovered it was an empire.
But it didn’t know what an empire was.
It thought that an empire was merely the biggest of all corporations.

- Roberto Calasso
Americans are so enamored of equality, they would rather
be equal in slavery than unequal in freedom.

- Alexis de Tocqueville
newtown
newtown
"No one, I thought, could watch those scenes, of young children slaughtered en masse, and so many parents grieving, without thinking that this, finally, would tip some kind of balance in the country."
JOIN THE DISCUSSION
newtown
If you are prepared to accept the consequences of your dreams
then you must still regard America today with the same naive
enthusiasm as the generations that discovered the New World.

- Jean Baudrillard
I am willing to love all mankind, except an American.
- Samuel Johnson
America, thou half brother of the world;
With something good and bad of every land.

- Philip Bailey
"What can be more powerful than disinformation in the Information Age?"
JOIN THE DISCUSSION
England and America are two countries separated by the same language.
- Sir Walter Besant
Christopher Columbus, as everyone knows, is honored by
posterity because he was the last to discover America.

- James Joyce
Now, from America, empty indifferent things
are pouring across, sham things, dummy life.

- Rainer Maria Rilke
If the United States is to recover fortitude and lucidity,
it must recover itself, and to recover itself it must
recover the "others"- the outcasts of the Western world.
- Octavio Paz
The youth of America is their oldest tradition.
It has been going on now for three hundred years.

- Oscar Wilde
"America really is, for most Americans, all things considered, a good place to be, and all they really want is for everyone to enjoy the same privilege and pleasure."
JOIN THE DISCUSSION
When good Americans die they go to Paris;
when bad Americans die they go to America.

- Oscar Wilde
jobs drug dealer
jobs drug dealer
They're nothing more than traffickers; and as the smart traffickers'll tell you, you don't use the merchandise. They are just inoculating their kids with a tech-drug serum, to immunize them against the very merchandise that put the **** bowling alley in their basement.
jobs drug dealer
America is therefore the land of the future, where, in the ages that
lie before us, the burden of the World's History shall reveal itself.

- Georg Friedrich Hegel
America is a large, friendly dog in a very small room.
Every time it wags its tail, it knocks over a chair.

- Arnold Toynbee
Americans always try to do the right thing after they've tried everything else.
- Winston Churchill
The thing that impresses me most about Americans
is the way parents obey their children.

- Edward, Duke of Windsor
Americans are apt to be unduly interested in discovering
what average opinion believes average opinion to be.

- John Maynard Keynes
Europe was created by history.
America was created by philosophy.

- Margaret Thatcher
America is God's crucible, the great Melting-Pot where all the races of
Europe are melting and reforming!... The real American has not yet arrived.
He is only in the crucible, I tell you - he will be the fusion of all races.

- Israel Zangwill
American dreams are strongest in the hearts of those
who have seen America only in their dreams.

- Pico Iyer
America: It's like Britain, only with buttons.
- Ringo Starr
The essential American soul is hard, isolate, stoic, and a killer.
It has never yet melted.

― D.H. Lawrence
I have two conflicting visions of America.
One is a kind of dream landscape and the other is a kind of black comedy.

― Bono
The American mirror, said the voice, the sad American mirror
of wealth and poverty and constant useless metamorphosis,
the mirror that sails and whose sails are pain.

― Roberto Bolaño

March 23, 2019

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Author Topic: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots


Kathleen-
Fox
Novice Their American
Posts: 5
Kathleen Fox
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: November 21, 2014, 14:44

What we don’t talk about when we talk about words:

Pontiac: A North American Indian, chief of the Ottawa tribe during the eighteenth century. Pontiac commanded this tribe during the Pontiac War of 1763. In 1818, the state of Michigan named a city after Pontiac as he was said to have been buried near this southeastern region. In 1926, the automobile brand ‘Pontiac’ was created.

Alas, in 1984, Louise Erdrich wrote “Dear John Wayne”. As Geoff mentioned in an earlier posting, Erdrich’s poem, like much of Thomas King’s work, is an intimate comment on the destructiveness of colonization and how this has come to shape internal and external images of native American identity. Erdrich writes of August and lounging “on the hood of the Pontiac”(2) at the drive-in picture.

I gather that one of the things we are talking about when we talk about Native Americans and Sport Mascots, like the Washington Redskins, is the commodification of a marginalized culture (a culture that we, collectively, have never taken the time to properly understand). Better yet, we are discussing the kind of materialization that is associated with cultural identities. Overall, I think Louise Erdrich is suggesting something similar in her reference to a Pontiac vehicle. Pontiac was a human being! I can only assume that he belonged to a culture whereby honouring a chief was seldom associated with the rebranding of individuals into engineered technology.

It is important to bring attention to the subtleties of Erdrich’s poetry, or the ambiguity of branded costumes; it is here that we can visualize the nation’s historical truths into tangible ‘stuff’. Arguably, I think we belong to a society that has come to rely on this material process.



Ashley-
Wilson
Novice Their American
Posts: 5
Ashley Wilson
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: November 23, 2014, 22:25

For as long as I can remember watching sports, I've always questioned why teams had names that "represented" certain races and ethnic groups and acted as if that was an okay thing to do. Obviously there is a lot of money to be tied into the names of these teams such as the Redskins, eskimos, or teams called the indians or braves, but many of these team owners don't realize how hurtful it can be to someone to take their lifestyle and use it as a way to market a team. Even the people who newscast the sports teams accept the fact that a team is called the Redskins and reinforce the term to be allowed by using it. I find it more interesting that people say nothing about the Montreal Canadians. I know hockey is "canadian's game", but by them because called the Canadians, it doesn't make them anymore Canadian than another Canadian hockey team. Same thing goes for the Redskins; half of them probably aren't even from that type of group. I believe its wrong, that people such as TSN and ESPN should stop reinforcing it and that there should be strict rules of the names of teams. You're cheering for the people on the team and for them to succeed, not the name they are labelled therefore, changing the name shouldn't be such a big deal (to me at least) ..



leahtucker
Novice Their American
Posts: 6
leahtucker
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: November 24, 2014, 16:23

This has always been a debate that blows my mind. It is blatant racism and for some reason most people have no moral dilemma with it. This kind of name or representation would NEVER be accepted for any other ethnic/cultural group, but for some reason, Native American's are seen as some cruel exception to the rule. Natives have been treated like garbage throughout out most of Western history and this is just an extension of this same horrendous treatment.

I have had conversations with some pretty level-headed people; people I consider to be my close friends and family and have never heard an ignorant comment from them except when it comes to this topic. The whole argument that the name is built into the brand and is part of the team seems to be what they fall back on. That point, in my opinion, is total b*llshit (excuse my language, but it is the only way I can think to describe it). If a sports team's name included the N word or any other derogatory term towards a race, even if the team was created back when these terms were acceptable (which most of them were), I would bet a lot of money that it would have been changed a long time ago. Racism is usually not tolerated, as seen recently with the Clipper's owners extremely offensive remarks and his following banning from the NBA. Why aren't Native Americans treated with the same dignity? To me it is kind of like saying, "We don't allow black people to be put down, or any other minority, but when it comes to Native Americans, it is all in good fun so it doesn't really matter. You don't really matter". This is extremely problematic and I am so frustrated that people do not see it this way.

The whole idea that Native Americans aren't really that offend to me seems a bit sketchy. If it is not that big of a deal, then why has there been a constant movement against the name? Maybe some people aren't offended by it, but some certainly are, so shouldn't their opinions count as well?

I come from a town that has three pretty big reserves in the surrounding area and I would NEVER refer to my Native friends as "redskins", so it makes me pretty uncomfortable to see that term glamorized and plastered all over a football field or a sports network. The term was, at one time, used to degrade Native Americans and though people may not use it in that way now, that does not change the terrible history behind the word. A team called the "Washington Redskins" is just acceptable racism in my opinion and it is pretty disgusting.

If a person doesn't identify with a term, then you don't refer to them using that term. End of discussion.



leahtucker
Novice Their American
Posts: 6
leahtucker
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: November 24, 2014, 16:27

ALSO, a point that I forgot about but is as equally frustrating. If a Washington fan encountered an actual Native American while dressed in an offensive, insulting costume that supposedly represents and honours Native Americans, would they feel comfortable? Probably not. Because they know that it is actually super insulting and degrading. Kind of like the whole premise of this sports team's name.



simpson
Novice Their American
Posts: 8
simpson
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: November 24, 2014, 17:34

It seems people believe Native Americans don't find the Redskins name offensive. Let's debunk that myth right now! Here's a link: New Study Finds 67% Of Native Americans Find Redskins Name Offensive

Here's some background on that Navajo president he invited to the game that Tyler mentioned:

Shelly entered office under a dark cloud, being charged with fraud, conspiracy and theft in connection with allegations that he had dipped into slush funds to benefit himself and family members. The charges against Shelly were dropped in exchange for him agreeing to pay back $8,250 he was accused of stealing from the tribal government.
Shelly's public support of Snyder has clashed with his own tribal council, which voted 9-2 in April to formally oppose the nickname "Redskins."
Shelly was accused of going behind the back of tribal leaders when he partnered with Dan Snyder's Original Americans Foundation (OAF) to host a golf tournament. When sponsors the National Indian Gaming Association and the Notah Begay III Foundation learned of the involvement of Snyder's foundation, they withdrew their support.

Fun times! Redskins owner Dan Snyder also trots out fake Native Americans to defend his racist team all the time. See here and here.

It's a hell of a lot easier to have a not-racist team name, or even a not-maybe-racist team name, than it is to dig in your heals and defend a probably-racist team name. "It's been a racist team name for a hundred years!" or however many years is not a worthwhile or convincing defense.



liz.k
Novice Their American
Posts: 5
liz.k
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: November 24, 2014, 19:33

This has been a very interesting discussion so far although I believe that, although there has been polls done to "prove" that these mascots and slogans aren't offensive to Native Americans, this is still a problem of institutionalized racism. Although some may not be directly offended by the images they see, I cannot even begin to swallow that in digesting the idea of letting these images simply slide. These images, and for the most part almost all native american images portrayed in mainstream western culture, are racist and inaccurate portrayals of Native Americans in America. Although these may not offend the polled groups directly, the fact that these images are blatantly racist and are accepted will only continue to perpetuate racist stereotypes by those who continue to recognize this behaviour and representation as acceptable. By allowing these images to remain based on the "approval" of "genuine" Native Americans seems to me as quite the cheap shot. The very fact that there needed to be proof provided by the group it seems to be offending is indicative of its level of disrespect and disregard for racial minorities in America. I am only left to ask why a baseball team's name is being valued at the same level of respect as the rights of an entire demographic of people that have been having their rights questioned long before the invention of baseball itself. The fact that there is even a debate around this issue speaks volumes of the progress, or rather lack thereof, of race relations in America. The fact that there are excuses made in regard to how these images are not racist is appalling and frankly disappointing but not surprising. Once again, we are faced with the issue of a minority in America having to defend their natural rights for respect, equality, and acknowledgment. And once again, the white majority who holds the last say in defending their discriminatory acts. These images should be changed as they do nothing but continue to turn the wheel of institutionalized racism with an official hand.



jacyfuller-
ton
Novice Their American
Posts: 5
JacyFullerton
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: December 4, 2014, 14:32

Admittedly, although the use of Native Americans as logos & mascots can be found in American sports teams -- for example, the Chicago Blackhawks in the NHL -- it is not only Americans who commit these wrongs, & not only major league sports teams either. Coming from a small town in Nova Scotia, Canada, I have been exposed to many ignorant & prejudiced actions & comments about First Nations people. Small towns are very often less cultured & therefore do not see the harm in racializing & exploiting a certain ethnicity. My high school's team name for sports was the Parrsboro Warriors -- Sounds typical enough, right? Our mascot, however, was very similar to that of the Blackhawks -- A Native man's head. Five years ago, when I was in grade 11, the school was asked by our schoolboard to change the mascot as it was derogatory towards First Nations people. We ended up changing it to a Greek Spartan. I guess my point, however, is that this type of racial abuse is not only common in the United States, but in other countries as well. It just seems more prominent in America due to the large population & higher level of media coverage.



Mike-
Langston
Veteran Their American
Posts: 42
Mike Langston
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: January 6, 2015, 05:18

Really great sign here of the momentum that is building in terms of our power to change these names...

Half Acre Changes Name of Heyoka Brew After Complaints by Native Americans
By Patty Wetli and Mark Schipper on January 5, 2015 2:38pm
Heyoka India Pale Ale will now be called Senita out of respect for the Lakota people, Half Acre said. Heyoka India Pale Ale will now be called Senita out of respect for the Lakota people, Half Acre said. View Full Caption Half Acre Beer Co.
NORTH CENTER — Half Acre has renamed its Heyoka India Pale Ale brew after receiving complaints from members of the Native-American Lakota people.

The brewery's founder Gabriel Magliaro said the name change for the "hugely popular beer" was motivated by outreach from "dozens" of members of the Lakota community who found use of the word in this context offensive.

"I’m not sure who exactly got word of it in the community, but it was a pretty effective initial onslaught of reaching out to us in a lot of different ways," Magliaro told DNAinfo. "We were able to have a lot of very positive conversations, and it was actually just as much positive feedback ... [as] there was initial concern or negative comment."

Magliaro says he was originally drawn to the Lakota word out of "fascination" with "the contrarian aspect" of the spirit it represents.

In the Lakota language, heyoka refers to a sacred clown, an individual who's one part trickster, one part shaman. Such "rebel spirits" often exhibit contrarian behavior — claiming to be cold when it's hot, riding their horse backwards, etc.

On the one hand, heyoka reinforce cultural norms by showing how not to act while at the same time raising questions about subjects considered too sensitive for others to broach.

http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20150105/north-center/half-acre-changes-name-of-heyoka-brew-after-complaints-by-native-americans



Mike-
Langston
Veteran Their American
Posts: 42
Mike Langston
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: September 24, 2015, 16:32

Change is coming! (On the Washington football team's nickname front.)

It actually took professionally stepping outside the Washington bubble for the first time in a decade to fully grasp we've now come to a place we haven't been before.

In late June, the Washington Post ran a 16-question quiz, asking readers whether they could differentiate between statements made defending the Confederate flag and the name of Washington's NFL team. The exercise showed how the two were essentially interchangeable.

In early July, a federal judge upheld the stripping of the team's federal trademark protection on the basis of the moniker being offensive to Native Americans.

California, the most populous state in the nation and home to three NFL franchises, passed legislation this month ensuring no public school will ever call itself what Washington's NFL team calls itself.

In Madison, Wisconsin, historically a liberal town but practically middle America, kids can't even wear clothing to school with Native-themed teams on it. Imagine being the parent of an Indians or Braves fan and your child comes home to give you the lecture about a living people not being mascots. [...]

http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/13724289/washington-redskins-name-change-inevitable



Mike-
Langston
Veteran Their American
Posts: 42
Mike Langston
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: October 9, 2015, 22:46



Mike-
Langston
Veteran Their American
Posts: 42
Mike Langston
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: October 21, 2015, 21:35

And re: Halloween costumes (let this be the year they're finally shamed out of existence)...



LeoY
New Member
Posts: 1
LeoY
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: October 25, 2015, 17:28

The guy responsible for these really great videos is actually an Asian man, Chris Lam, who works for Buzzfeed. Just found this article about him. He explains the kind of stereotypes that Native Americans face every day and how important it is to make a presence for us in the mainstream culture that we control.
http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/10/23/meet-chris-lam-buzzfeed-creator-all-those-awesome-native-american-videos-162198

The courage of allies is a matter to be celebrated, especially when it comes to braving the tangle of complex Native issues. Conversations of Native American identity, tribal rights, marginalization, generational trauma, and cultural appropriation leave many non-Native folks scratching their head bewildered, uncomfortable, or in a state of impassioned denial. And frankly, some very stubborn Americans simply just do not want to hear it.

To be sure, grappling with Native issues is not for the faint of heart, as “going there” typically requires the dismantling of deeply imbedded pre-conceived notions, and this can be very touchy. Thus, often times, many Natives find themselves speaking our truths to the masses alone, slowly but surely, educating America one isolated victory at a time.

The struggle can be frustrating, exhausting, and for some, overwhelming. I repeat, this work is not for the faint of heart.

Cue in the audacious and marvelous Chris Lam, Indian country’s latest ally.



rose
Novice Their American
Posts: 9
Anonymous Rose
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: March 9, 2016, 09:02

I am very offended by the racist logos and such that the national or otherwise sports teams have been using for many years. As a child I knew it was racist and didn't like it. Several times over the years there have been people/organizations that have expressed their intense dislike for it and hoped to change that. Thus far there have not been any significant changes. Imagine the head honcho refusing to change the Washington team name, well the team is after all in the state capitol, is it not? I believe he is an almighty racist himself, hence his refusal to concede. An earlier post commented that if it's okay for the Anishinaabe then it must be okay. I must inform such person, some of the Anishinaabek are not as educated about extreme racism or all of its content to fully understand it. Yes there is talk, sometimes that is not enough, if one does not know the history how could they comprehend the underlying tones. That being said, money does talk for some, and for others, well faith and a good sense of one's own religious values does prevail. Doing the right thing has always been a good virtue has it not?



JeanGiroux
Novice Their American
Posts: 8
JeanGiroux
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: March 19, 2016, 21:35

Interesting conversation so far! As an avid NFL fan myself, I know of the Washington Redskins' history and can understand the owner's reasons for wanting to preserve the team's tradition. However, the fact that many Native Americans have spoken out against the word's usage should warrant a greater authority intervening and forcing a name change.

That said, a significant portion of Native Americans support the team name; one example of this was a National Annenberg Election Survey conducted in 2004 where 90% of Native American respondents said they weren't insulted by the 'redskin' epithet. Others have claimed that this isn't an accurate representation of Native American sentiment. This issue ultimately boils down to personal opinion, and in this case, for the time being, Dan Snyder's opinion is the only one that matters (and he has yet to change it as of March 2016).

What stands out to me is the manner in which this aggrandized issue is distracting from the more important sociopolitical matters at hand, namely, the continued undermining of Native American rights. G. Anne Richardson, chief of Virginia’s Rappahannock Tribe, is quoted as saying "There are so many more issues that are important for the tribe than to waste time on what a team is called. We’re worried about real things, and I don’t consider that a real thing. We’re more worried about our kids being educated, our people housed, elder care and the survival of our culture. We’ve been in that survival mode for 400 years. We’re not worried about how some ball team is named". I am inclined to side with Mrs. Richardson, as I believe changing the team's name would merely be a placating political tactic that is somehow supposed to serve as recompense for injustices that have been committed for centuries.



sergiobald-
ini
Novice Their American
Posts: 6
Serge
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: March 21, 2016, 16:19

I believe that the reason that sports teams continue to use offensive team nicknames and imagery, like the Redskins and the Indians, is a combination of an obstinate belief in a supposed history and the fact that the image and name are licensed resulting in millions of dollars in merchandising sales and other related revenue. It should come as no surprise that in the US money is driving the motivations of these organizations. After all, with television revenue and the expansion of broadcasting rights, the name and image can be seen by a greater audience and, therefore, generate more money. Owners will cite their considerable investment in the organization and a right to make a profit and that argument is sound. From a business perspective, any investor should have the opportunity to receive a financial return. However, corporate responsibility has taken a back seat to the need for profit, money becoming the only factor in decision making. This is not a new phenomenon. To end, the idea that a long and venerated history is enough of a reason to keep an offensive logo and name is only supported by those whose status and place in society has come at the expense of the victimized and marginalized groups they lampoon and disgrace in their image and name.



superfly
Experienced Their American
Posts: 11
superfly
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: April 3, 2016, 11:45

Even though I do not culturally or religiously “celebrate” Halloween, as a kid, I always found the colourful “costumes,” props, ensembles of portrayals of characters to be unique, alluring, and creative. Until it happened to me. Until I realized that an essential part of my religious identity, the Muslim veil was being donned as a joke, a prop – then, I was enraged, downright offended. A fundamental part of my religious expression, one that represented modesty was being paraded around as a costume. At that moment, I purged myself of all past feelings of joy at seeing many Pocahontases or other forms of cultural appropriation. Culture appropriation is not okay and it must cease to exist. What one person believes to be a celebration of another’s culture by wearing it for a few hours, is increasingly an offense to entire communities who have worked hard to protect the sanctity, quality, and traditions of their culture. To use native Indian imagery as mascots is barbaric and regressive. To use such imagery for financial profit and mass marketing is perhaps sickening on a whole other level. Harsher enforcement must be implemented to make sure it does not occur, and strict penalties – such as forfeiting a game – should be the punishment for teams or corporations who break the rules.



Geoff-
Hamilton
Administrator
Posts: 172
Geoff Hamilton
Re: Native Americans and Sports Nicknames/Mascots
on: December 15, 2017, 23:15

from Telesur
Image

Native American NFL Hoax: 'Redskins Renamed Redhawks'
The campaign created a Twitter account and five web pages, including news stories, in an elaborate online hoax mocking the team's allegedly racist name.
Tired of the racist name and mascot of the National Football League's Washington Redskins, Native American advocates produced an elaborate hoax reporting that the Redskins had changed their name to the Redhawks.

The online campaign, led by a group called Rising Hearts, created a Twitter account and five web pages made to resemble the real pages of The Washington Post, ESPN, Sports Illustrated and Bleacher Report, as well as a website for the fictional team that bore the burgundy and gold of the Redskins with the new Redhawks logo.

The "fake news" included quotes from Redskins coach Coach Jay Gruden and team owner Daniel Snyder, as well as a number of fans, activists, politicians and others commenting on the fictitious name change. [...]

https://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Native-American-NFL-Hoax-Redskins-Renamed-Redhawks-20171214-0032.html

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